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Pure Silk Harold Clayton Painting Tableau / Wall Hanging /25.5cm x 25.5cm

£39.99

Sold out

Pure Silk Harold Clayton Painting Tableau / Wall Hanging /25.5cm x 25.5cm

£39.99

Sold out

SKU: WA-PS-04 Category:

Pure Silk Harold Clayton Painting Tableau / Wall Hanging /25.5cm x 25.5cm

Original Painting: Harold Clayton (1896-1979) “Flowers in a vase”
100% Pure silk fabric painted with a traditional method and framed.
Made in Bursa, Turkey.
A classy and elegant decorative item.
Ideal for many places like home, office, cafe,..etc.
A perfect gift.
Size: 25.5cm x 25.5 cm

About History of Silk Trade in Bursa, Turkey:
Nestled against the slopes of Mount Uludag (the ancient Mount Olympus) in Western Anatolia, Bursa emerged as an important town in Classical Antiquity. Of major significance for the city’s future was the inauguration of the silk industry in Byzantium under Emperor Justinian, as a result of which Bursa would eventually become a centre of silk production and trade.

Ottoman silk textiles are among the most elegant textiles produced in the Islamic world. They are characterized by large-scale stylized motifs often highlighted by shimmering metallic threads. Executed in a range of woven techniques including satin and velvet, these silks were produced for use both within the Ottoman empire and for export to Europe and the Middle East, where they were considered among the most prized luxury objects.

Bursa was the first capital of the Ottoman state (1326–65) and already an important entrepôt on the Eurasian trade route, allowing the Ottomans to function as middlemen in the trade of raw silk. Cocoons or undyed silk thread produced in Safavid Iran’s northern provinces of Gilan and Mazandaran passed through these territories; they were weighed on government-controlled scales and a further tax was levied on materials purchased by European merchants (who were mostly Italian). A decline in the export of Iranian raw silk in the mid-sixteenth century due to political strife instigated the beginnings of domestic sericulture in the Ottoman state, and from that point onward there was a larger variety of the quality of silk and fiercer competition for the European market.

Additional information

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